Michael Morrison

Author's posts

Mar 17

Snow Days and Deep Learning

by: Ed Brantmeier Does another snow day have you troubled? How can you meet your learning objectives in your course with less face to face time? Here are a few ideas that might promote deep learning, despite the snowy reality of class cancellation: Ask students to develop a creative project that exemplifies the learning goals …

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Feb 07

In Case You Missed It… Time Management for Faculty (2/6/2014)

In Case You Missed It… is a feature of the Center for Faculty Innovation blog providing resources from our programs for faculty who were not able to attend. Although no substitute for being able to attend, we hope that this follow up is useful to you.   On Thursday, Douglas Harrison engaged faculty in a …

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Feb 03

In Case You Missed It… Reason and Wonder: Revolutions in Human Self Perceptions (1/27/2014)

In Case You Missed It… is a feature of the Center for Faculty Innovation blog providing resources from our programs for faculty who were not able to attend. Although no substitute for being able to attend, we hope that this follow up is useful to you.   Last Monday, Dave Pruett presented a scholarly talk …

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Jan 28

In Case You Missed It… JMU Year One: Teaching First Year Students (1/24/2014)

In Case You Missed It… is a feature of the Center for Faculty Innovation blog providing resources from our programs for faculty who were not able to attend. Although no substitute for being able to attend, we hope that this follow up is useful to you.   Last Friday, Jim McConnel and Kristin Sowden engaged …

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Jan 06

Nurture Your Inner Scholar

by: Ed Brantmeier Mindfulness, simply put, is about paying attention. Paying attention to the moment can have profound impact on experience and perception. Do you pay attention to your scholarship? Is it tough to find the moments to pay attention? Let’s go on an introspective journey together. Why did you become an academic? Was it …

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Apr 25

Gauging Student Learning Through Surveys

by: Andreas Broscheid At the end of every semester we want to – or are required to – find out how successful our classes were. Final papers, project reports, and exams are part of determining whether students achieved the goals we set for them, and student course evaluations give students the opportunity for class feedback …

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Apr 09

Two-way Streets, Mutual Understanding, and May Symposium

by: Ed Brantmeier Mutual understanding is a two-way street concept, particularly in the context of cross-cultural exchange and communication. The two-way street concept is about learning from one another in authentic, relational ways that foster perspective consciousness (Hanvey, 1976) and deepened self-awareness. It is not simply about learning about “others” — a one-way street approach. …

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Apr 02

In Their Shoes: The Flipped Classroom

by: Cara Meixner Next week’s workshop, led by an engaging panel of faculty who perform the gymnastic feat weekly – if not daily – will present participants with the unique opportunity to experience this pedagogy as if they were undergraduate or graduate students. Modeling each aspect of flipped pedagogy, the workshop facilitators have planned an …

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Mar 29

Is Any Of This Doing Any Good?

by: Elizabeth V. Berkeley A colleague (whom I respect) said to me, in response to my mention of an interest in assessment, “Americans are the only academics obsessed with assessment”. Well, as a relatively novice teacher, I want to know if what I’m doing is doing any good. Will my students be better scientists if …

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Mar 27

The Allure of the Lockdown…

by: Carol Hurney At first I wasn’t sure why so many faculty flocked to the “Bootcamp for Scholarly Writers” offered by the CFI during January and May Symposium. But now I know. I know because about 2 years ago I attended my first bootcamp/lockdown experience. Here is what I learned. I learned that sitting in …

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