Tag: academia

What does master teaching have in common with being a professional race car driver or a professional golfer?

by: Kenn Barron Recently, I was asked what makes someone a master teacher. Like many concepts in higher education, there are numerous definitions linked with what a “master teacher” is or what a “master teacher” does. But rather than offering a definition, I wanted to share an analogy that I heard at a national teaching …

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Fly High in Your Writing

by: Ed Brantmeier Fits and starts, mountains and valleys, scheduled and binge—these are how the writing processes of many go during the academic year. Recently I was at a national conference where I attended a workshop on writing productivity. The facilitator insisted that creating a writing log, consisting of time spent writing per day and …

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First Generation and the Unfamiliar Academy

by: Ed Brantmeier Making the familiar strange, the strange familiar—this is the work of ethnography from the vantage point of an anthropologist whose name escapes me at the moment. In terms of first generation college status — I call a related concept “dual alienation.”  In informal conversations I’ve had with faculty and students who are …

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Scholarly Blogging: Changing Expectations or Behaviors?

by: Carol Hurney Earlier this week a story on NPR reflected on studies performed in 1964 by Robert Rosenthal exploring how teacher expectations of student ability influenced how they interacted and worked with students.  Briefly, Rosenthal demonstrated that teachers provide more feedback, approval, and time to answer questions to students they were told were on …

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