Meet the Characters

Take a look at the main characters as they have been represented through various media across the ages. Feel free to click on the images to find out more information or enlarge the photo.

Poseidon

Poseidon- God of the Sea, he has the power to calm the seas and make it rain. Often, sailors would pray to him for safe voyage and make sacrifices to him, typically by drowning a horse. Poseidon is normally seen with a triton, a powerful three-pronged fishing spear that gave him the power to raise tempests and cause earthquakes.

Poseidon in The Little Mermaid.
Hand-painted, religious oil painting of Poseidon.
Miniature Poseidon sculpture.
The Return of Neptune by John Singleton Copley was finished in 1754.
Outside of Poseidon’s Fury water ride in Universal’s Island of Adventure.
This sculpture of Poseidon sits in the port of Copenhagan.
An artist’s digital rendering of Poseidon.
A Poseidon sculpture in Rome, Italy.

Cassandra

Cassandra, in greek mythology, is the daughter of King Priam and Queen Hecuba of Troy. The god Apollo granted her the ability to see and hear the future but once she denied the god’s attempt at seduction he transformed her gift into a curse. Apollo did not take away her ability to tell the future, instead he made it so no one would ever believe her. This curse caused people to think she was somewhat crazy even though her future tellings were still very accurate.

Cassandra by Evelyn De Morgan (1898, London); Cassandra in front of the burning city of Troy at the peak of her insanity.
“Cassandra’s Vision of Troy Falling” a canvas print created by Rosy Hall.
Someone’s painting of their interpretation of how Cassandra is going crazy as Greek ships approach Troy.
Cassandra by Evelyn De Morgan (1898, London); Cassandra in front of the burning city of Troy at the peak of her insanity.
A picture of Princess Cassandra of Troy imploring Athena to gain revenge on Ajax the Lesser by Jerome Martin Langlois (who lived from 1779-1839).
This image is a wood engraving of Cassandra yelling at Helen as Troy is being burned in the background. This engraving is titled “Helen and Cassandra” done by, Frederick Sandys in 1866.
Bronze sculpture of Cassandra.
During the Trojan War, Cassandra was attacked by Ajax the Lesser in the Temple of Athena. The scene is illustrated in this painting from a house in Italy.

Andromache

Andromache in Greek mythology was married to Hector who during the Trojan war was killed by Achilles. She suffers through the loss of many family members during and after the war.

A photo of Hector and Andromache from the 2004 movie “Troy”
A picture of Princess Cassandra of Troy imploring Athena to gain revenge on Ajax the Lesser by Jerome Martin Langlois (who lived from 1779-1839)
A painting done of Hector and Andromache titled Andromache Mourning Hector, by Jacques-Louis David in 1783.
From the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston an oil painting of Hector and Andromache titled, Parting of Hector and Andromache by, John Smibert in 1750 .
This pen-and-ink drawing once held a spot on Thomas Jefferson’s walls and depicts Hector leaving Andromache for battle, a scene from the Iliad created by Benjamin West.
“Andromache and Astyanax” painted by Charles Boulanger de Boisfrémont was done on canvas in oil between the years of 1813-1824.
Tiltled “Hector Farewell to Andromache” was created by Christoffer Wilhelm Eckersberg (1783 – 1853, Danish).
An Italian Sculpture “Hector and Andromache” was created by Giovanni Maria Benzoni  (1809–1873) and shows Hector leaving Andromache for war.
An Italian Sculpture “Hector and Andromache” was created by Giovanni Maria Benzoni (1809–1873) and shows Hector leaving Andromache for war.

Hecuba

In Greek mythology, Hecuba, or Queen of Troy was the wife to King Priam of Troy during the Trojan war. With him, she had 19 children, including Cassandra, a prominent character in the Trojan Women as well as her brothers Paris and Hector.

Katharine Hepburn as The Queen of Troy in the 1971 film the Trojan Women.
Image of Hecuba in ‘Women of Troy’ (BBC, 1958)
Hecuba from the ‘Promptuarii Iconum Insigniorum,’ a book published by Guillaume Rouillé in 1553. (wikipedia)
Berry College Theater’s production of Euripides’ ‘Hecuba,’ with Hecuba portrayed as a motherly figure.
Deviant Art image of Hecuba By “Mix09” (Lucas)
Hecuba becoming a slave. © Mary Evans Picture Library
Katharine Hepburn playing Hecuba.
Production of Trojan Women directed by Tamiko Washington in 2009 at Chapman University.

Helen

In Greek mythology, Helen, is the daughter of Zeus and Leda (wife of the Spartan King, Tyndareus).  She was well known for being considered the most beautiful woman in the world during her time, and was called either Helen of Troy or Helen of Sparta.  She was married to Menelaus, King of Mycenae and later King of Sparta.  Her abduction by Paris, a Trojan prince, marks the beginning of the Trojan War.

This painting, “Helen of Troy,” was completed by Dante Gabriel Rossetti in 1863. It is now located in the Kunsthalle Hamburg, an art museum located in Hamburg, Germany.
This depiction of Helen was created by Claire (Phoenix57flame) and posted to the website, deviantart.com, in January of 2009.
A photo of Helen from the 2004 movie “Troy”, here the character is played by Diane Kruger.
“Helen of Troy,” was created using mixed media by Bill Mather in 2011.
This painting, “Helen of Troy,” was completed by Evelyn de Morgan in 1898.
This bust of Helen was created by Antonio Canova in 1812. It is now on display in the Victoria & Albert Museum in London, England.
This “Helen of Troy” was painted by Frederick Sandys in 1867, just four years after Rossetti’s rendition. Rossetti caused a stir, claiming Sandys’ depiction was too similar to his own, despite the different hair colors.
A photo from the 1927 silent film “The Private Life of Helen of Troy”. Here, Helen is portrayed by the actress Maria Corda.